Keynote speakers

Keynote speakers

 

Opportunities and Challenges for increasing performance of machining operations for Aircraft and Helicopter parts.

 

Dr. Matt Davies

The Importance of Surface Integrity in the Manufacture of Freeform Optics

BIO

Ph.D in Aerospace Engineering from Cornell University (1993) and then joined the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at NIST.   He then came to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Center for Precision Metrology, in the spring of 2002. Dr. Davies’ research focuses on the study of applied engineering systems and the development of practical applied manufacturing and metrology solutions. In particular, his work at NIST was applied to the stability of high-speed machining processes and on the study of the complex plastic flows of material that occur in the vicinity of the tool in machining processes.  He has continued this research at Charlotte where his group developed a high-bandwidth thermal imaging system that produced the highest resolution thermal images of chip formation available at the time. Dr. Davies has pursued two new research areas, metrology and mechanics for the biomedical device industry and the ultraprecision machining of complex optics.  He has published several papers on the biomechanics of implants including the first papers on the mechanics of implants for the cervical spine with articulating (ball) joints, and papers on the deformation of the acetabular cup in hip implants and its implications for implant wear. He started a research group focused on the manufacture of freeform and structured optics and is the leader of the Freeform Optics Research Group. Within this group, Dr. Davies was the Director for the Center for Freeform Optics a collaborative consortium with the University of Rochester between 2015 and 2019. During that time, he helped build the Center membership to 18 non-academic members.  Dr. Davies has received numerous honors and awards and has more than 75 technical publications and three patents.   He is a Fellow of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, was awarded the United States Department of Commerce Bronze Medal in 1998, the Society of Manufacturing Engineering, John T. Parsons, Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award in 2000, the Bonnie Cone Professor for Excellence in Teaching in 2007, the Bank of America Award for Teaching Excellence in 2016 and the North Carolina Board of Governors Teaching Award in 2017.  He is currently also conducting research in Adaptive Learning for the teaching of Engineering System Dynamics and has been a Fellow of the CIRP since 2009.

ABSTRACT

Many complex optics are manufactured by ultraprecision machining processes such as multi-axis diamond turning, diamond milling and diamond grinding. Along with computational optical design, multi-degree-of-freedom manufacturing operations and associated equipment have been a driving force behind the development of freeform optics, a disruptive technology in the optics industry.  Freeform optics are optics without an axis of symmetry either on or off the optic. Freeform optics allow the nearly arbitrary redirection of light in three dimensions and therefore many axisymmetric designs can be replaced with freeform designs having improved performance or drastically reduced size and part count.  Sometimes entirely new optical functions can be realized. However, freeform optics pose significant challenges for manufacturing and metrology. One of the major challenges is maintaining surface integrity using sub-aperture manufacturing methods. In this talk we discuss the effects of surface integrity on optical performance, from the effects of surface roughness and mid-spatial frequency errors to the effect of residual stresses and sub-surface damage. Metrology methods for measuring and characterizing surface integrity will also be discussed. We will give specific examples ranging from the effect of surface integrity on a freeform all-reflective imaging system to the effects of subsurface damage on transmissive infrared optics.

Professor Bernhard Karpuschewski

Surface integrity aspects in gear manufacturing

BIO

Graduated from the University of Hannover, Germany. He received his Ph.D. degree in 1995 with a thesis titled “Micromagnetic surface integrity analysis of case hardened steel workpieces” at the Institute for Production Engineering and Machine Tools (IFW), University of Hannover. From 1995 until April 1999 he worked as chief engineer of the Institute. From May 1999 until October 2000 he accepted a position as Associate Professor at the Keio University, Yokohama (Japan). Following this he was appointed as full professor for production engineering and head of the Laboratory for Production Technology and Organisation (PTO) at the Technical University of Delft (Netherlands), where he worked until March 2005. From April 2005 until August 2017 he worked as full professor for production engineering and managing director of the Institute for Production Technology and Quality Management (IFQ) at the Otto-von-Guericke-University in Magdeburg (Germany). Since September 2017 he has been professor at the University of Bremen (Germany) and director of the Division Manufacturing Technology at the Leibniz Institute for Materials Engineering IWT. Since August 2001 he has been a member of the International Academy for Production Engineering Research (CIRP) and became a fellow in 2005. He is currently Editor-in-chief of the CIRP Journal. 

ABSTRACT

Gears are highly loaded components used in many different applications such as automotive, aircraft turbines, ships or wind energy systems. The demand on gears can be summarised by ever rising load capacity on the one hand, and significant noise reduction on the other. Both demands can only be fulfilled by adapted gear finishing processes, generating the best possible macro- and micro- geometry as well as the desired surface integrity state. This keynote presents research work analysing the thermal load on gears during gear hobbing, surface integrity states by different hard gear finishing operations and alternatives to prevent thermal damage in gear manufacturing by adapted process monitoring and fast non-destructive analysing techniques.

Dr. Guillaume Abrivard

Opportunities and Challenges for increasing performance of machining operations for Aircraft and Helicopter parts.

BIO

Obtained his MSc in 2005 from ENSMA, a French aeronautical engineering school, with a specialization in Materials Science. He received a PhD in 2009 at Mines ParisTech, working on multiscale modelling of recrystallization in aluminium alloys during metal forming. He joined Airbus as a research engineer was in charge of machining activities for 8 years. He ensured the development of cost/performance optimized machining technologies for Airbus Divisions relying on collaborative projects with academics and industrial partners. Today, he is the Metallic Research Project Leader at Airbus Central Research and Technology, managing activities linked to metallic materials (such as Steel, Aluminum, Titanium and Inconel Alloys) and processes for 2 years. His main research interest concerns material behavior in aggressive environments (high temperature, humidity…) and under complex loading conditions (material dynamic behavior, fatigue in mix modes…); manufacturing technology efficiency and new processes for buy-to-fly reduction for Airbus group applications. Key contributions include increasing productivity for drilling hybrid stacks (composite and metals) and greener processes for drilling and milling aeronautical materials.

ABSTRACT

In recent years, airlines have been increasingly seeking greater aircraft fuel efficiency, which has led to a backlog of more than 7000 Airbus aircrafts in 2019. To satisfy this demand, there is a need to increase the number of aircraft deliveries every year and therefore improve the manufacturing productivity. Despite considerable development in near net shape manufacturing processes, machining remains the most widely used shaping operations for metallic parts within Airbus. Although significant efforts have been made in recent years to improve the productivity of machining operations the introduction of new machining technologies in production for running aircraft programs is often hampered by the cost of qualification to ensure part safety. Qualification requires numerous mechanical tests to validate any change in machining conditions. This is the way of working applied for the introduction of new processes but also for any cases of deviation from the specified conditions. One way to accelerate the introduction of new processes is to establish on the one hand the impact of machining conditions on surface integrity, and on the other hand, the effect of surface integrity on mechanical properties of the parts. There are many works in the literature on understanding those relationships qualitatively, however a more quantitative approach is needed. Modelling is key to reach this objective. The author will present the investigated machining technologies to increase part productivity, and how surface integrity is currently taken into account in aircraft and helicopter parts. The strategy to introduce the concept of surface integrity in the Airbus digital design manufacturing roadmap will also be discussed.

Professor Joel Rech

Surface integrity of parts produced by metal additive processes.

BIO

Joel Rech is Professor at the Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Saint-Etienne (University of Lyon). He leads a research group of 23 people working on the characterization and modelling of physical phenomena at the tool/workmaterial interface in cutting and superfinishing operations. He made remarkable breakthroughs in numerical modeling of surface integrity induced by cutting and polishing processes (residual stresses, roughness, microstructure) and in modeling of tribological phenomena (friction, wear etc.) of cutting tools. He has supervised 33 PhD theses and has published more than 250 papers that have been cited over 4500 times. He is member of the CIRP and takes part in the editorial committee of 5 international journals. He has been a member of more than 45 scientific committees of international conferences. Since 2014, he has been also Dean for Research in ENISE.

ABSTRACT

Additive manufacturing processes are increasingly gaining importance among mechanical industries. This new field of 3D metal printers covers a wide range of processes using various raw materials (powders, wires, compounds etc.) and different sources of energy (laser, electron beam etc.). It can be stated, however, that the surface integrity (roughness, microstructure, residual stress) of the surfaces generated by additive manufacturing differs considerably from the current state of the art produced by machining and superfinishing processes. This keynote will first aim at summarizing current developments in terms of surface integrity generated by metal additive processes. Then it will present some key finishing processes which can be applied to improve surface integrity depending on the shape of the part and the stiffness of the functional surfaces.